The Research, Analysis, Creation, and Characterization of Oxides and Oxide Nanostructures (RACCOON) Laboratory

 

Welcome to the world of the Masked Raider!

 

The RACCOON laboratory is a new facility within the Texas Tech University Department of Physics that is dedicated to the creation and characterization of thin films and metamaterials using transition (mostly) metal oxides as their basis.

This laboratory has been renovated and our initial equipment has arrived. From time to time, this page will be updated with new equipment and results.

 

Feel free to contact Dr. Kaye with any questions you might have.

 


Pulsed-Laser Deposition

We purchased a custom-built pulsed-laser deposition (PLD)/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system from SVT Associates; the system is currently optimized for PLD.

The main features of this system include:

The laser source for this system is a Coherent COMPexPro 205 KrF excimer laser (wavelength of 248 nm, 700 mJ maximum pulse energy, 50 Hz maximum pulse rate, 30 W maximum average power).

 

We are waiting for a final piece of hardware to ensure that the laser beam will actually hit the target, and we are still working with SVT to ensure that their control software (LabView-based) is working correctly.

 

Targets in hand include:

 

 

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Electron-Beam Deposition

We were lucky enough to recover an electron-beam system that was used by a faculty member who is no longer at Texas Tech. It was sitting (open to air!) for several years (!!), so its refurbishment has been non-trivial. The main system is composed of:

We have a number of crucible liners on hand, including:

In addition, the materials we are currently evaporating and/or evaluating include:

Two sample holders are currently being used:

 

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Microscopy

Our principle "in-house" microscopy tool is an Assylum Instruments MFP-3D-Bio atomic force microscope (AFM) that is housed in a vibration-isolated enclosure and kept on an air-floated vibration-isolated optical bench. In addition to the AFM unit itself, this piece of equipment includes and Olympus IX81 inverted optical microscope with three filter cassettes (with room available for additional filters) and a Princeton Instruments Cascade II:512 CCD camera. The inverted optical microscope and CCD camera are primarily for imaging biological systems, and we have made our system availabel to biophysicists (and others) who might need to use the system.

 

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Sol-Gel Fabrication

We have a fully-functional wet chemistry station that is dedicated to the production of thin films via the sol-gel technique. This area includes:

 

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Optical Performance Analysis

All of our optical characterization is carried out on a single 4' x 8' vibrationally-isolated optical bench. We have a small but capable collection of optics and opto-mechanical equipment, a small number of lasers that span the visible to near-infrared spectrum, two spectrometers that together span 300 nm to 2.6 microns, and several custom pieces of equipment. There is plenty of space for new experiements, and most of the instruments are controlled by a nearby Windows computer.

 

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Computational Resources

The laboratory has three dedicated computers:

In addition, the student offices have five dual-boot Windows/UNIX workstations (and one personally-owned Mac)

 

 

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Department of Physics

Texas Tech University